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Towards Rebirth: Hiroshima: Nagasaki

Dear reader, Let me present to your attention an interesting material (edited) from my notes “A Stroll in Japan” (November 2019), which can be useful and instructive for the Armenian nation during these hard times. Let’s hope that the example of our friendly country will be instructive and will give us strength to overcome the difficulties and gain faith that Armenia and the Armenian nation will reborn again and will have a strong economy in the nearest future. #We_Will_Reborn Towards Rebirth. Hiroshima. Nagasaki-1 “A Stroll in Japan”. Part #1 As soon as you get...
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Japanese Passports (Video)

translated from Armenian into English by M.Vardanyan
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Japanese Solution to Floods (Video)

translated from Armenian into English by M.Vardanyan
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Horror on a Japanese Way. Obakeyashik(Vi...

translated from Armenian into English by M.Vardanyan
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Tsukumogami

Tsukumogami

In the Japanese folklore there exists “tsukumogami” (付喪神) – an object, which has acquired a spirit. It is considered that if an object is 100 years old, it can gain consciousness. This especially concerns forgotten or lost items. For example, they believe in the existence of the spirit of straw sandal “bake-dzori” (化け草履). Every day putting on the sandal, there is established a close connection between the sandal and its owner. And when the owner stops wearing the sandal and forgets it in a corner of the wardrobe, decades past it turns into a...
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“Don’t feel sorry for yourself”: Haruki Murakami about People, Life and Relations

“Don’t feel sorry for yourself”: Haruki ...

2018-03-18 As Murakami himself was saying, the world is created and full of wonderful things and strange people. This wise man could see the souls of other people; he could encourage with words and made think about important things. How do people get themselves? Some need search for years others are inspired. This was the case with Haruki Murakami as well. In April 1978, during a baseball game he suddenly realized that he could write a book.  He still doesn’t know why at that time and why to write a book…. As the writer himself has said, I just realized that and...
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Health and Sports Day

Health and Sports Day is one of the national holidays of Japan. Since 2000 is has been decided to celebrate the holiday on the second Monday in October. In the memory of the brilliant achievements and excitement of the Olympic Games held in 1964 “The Day, when people get acquainted with sports and acquire healthy mind and body” was accepted as a national holiday. “To get acquainted with sports” doesn’t mean to watch, listen to or read about sports, but to go in for sports. Pursuing the goal of “Development of healthy mind and body” to move the body. In...
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“Tanabata” (Star Festival)

A Yearly Rendezvous Tanabata, or the star festival, is observed on July 7. As the date approaches, long, narrow strips of colorful paper known as tanzaku, vibrant ornaments, and other decorations are hung from bamboo branches, enlivening the decor of homes as well as brightening shopping arcades, train stations, and other public spaces. Before they are hung, tanzaku are inscribed with a wish, such as a child’s dream of becoming a famous soccer player or a parent’s hope for career success. A child places tanabata decorations on a bamboo branch. Tanabata is one of...
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Akutagava Ryunoske :”Art and about other things.”

Akutagava Ryunoske :”Art and about...

First and foremost the artist must seek perfection of his works. Otherwise, his serving of the art will become meaningless. Let’s take for example the concussion, which the ideas of humanism provoke: if only you seek it, you can achieve it by merely listening to an ordinary sermon. As we all serve the art, first of all our works must strike by their artistic nature. We don’t have any other way but to achieve their perfection. * * * “Art for art” -take another step and you’ll fall into transforming art into entertainment. “Art for the sake of life”–take...
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16 Wise Japanese Expressions, which can become the Source of your Slogans in 2016

16 Wise Japanese Expressions, which can ...

Sometimes you have the impression that the happiest people and people, who are satisfied with life, live in the Country of the Rising Sun. And the thing is that the culture of Japan differs from the cultures of other nations very much. From the ancient times, the Japanese know the secrets of spiritual health and harmonious existence. By reading these expressions, you will see how unique the wisdom of the Japanese nation is. Here are wise expressions of the Japanese: 1. Make a decision by means of thinking. And when you have already decided don’t think any more. 2....
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How to Celebrate the Japanese New Year

The New Year superstitions are characteristic for almost all countries. In this sense, Japan is not an exception. In Japan in New Year, you should manage to pay all your debts. Like many other countries in Japan, they also put in order their houses and prepare New Year dinner. It is a pleasure to celebrate O-syogatsu, the Japanese New Year, together with the family. In Japan, on New Year Eve the bells ring for 108 times. It is considered that there exist six human shortcomings: greediness, stupidity, jealousy, anger, light-mindedness and hesitancy. Each of them has 18...
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Glance to Japanese Culture

The material was prepared by ANI MAGUMYAN IKEBANA Everything is special in Japan: people, writing, nature, culture, philosophy. Speaking about Japan we cannot touch upon its culture, science, religion, philosophy, writing, samurais, national clothing (kimono), cuisine, each of which is characteristic and occupies an important place in this country. The Japanese writing is a system of writing consisting of hieroglyphs. It consists of hieroglyphs and two alphabets: hiragana and katakana. There is also the romaji version. This is the usage of the Latin alphabet for writing...
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Geisha

Geisha

The material was prepared by ANI MAGUMYAN Throughout the history, the Japanese have maintained and handed down from generation to generation all the beautiful and typical values, which are important and characteristic of their nation and history. Every time touching upon this or that sphere of the Japanese culture we are convinced that, the true maintenance of the beauty depends on the nation. This time we will refer to geishas, which is not only interesting but it is also teaching because by hearing the word geisha many people associate it with another...
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Suikawari

Suikawari (スイカ割り suika-wari, lit. Watermelon Splitting) is a traditional Japanese game that involves splitting a watermelon with a stick while blindfolded. Played in the summertime, suikawari is most often seen at beaches, but also occurs at festivals, picnics, and other summer events. Suikawari being played on a beach in Japan. The rules are similar to piñata. A watermelon is laid out, and participants one by one attempt to smash it open. Each is blindfolded, spun around three times, and handed a wooden stick, or bokken, to strike with. The first to...
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Kokeshi dolls from northern Japan

Kokeshi dolls from northern Japan

Kokeshi dolls are a traditional doll from northern Japan, usually made with a simple trunk for a body and an enlarged head. Decorated with bright colors, they are exchanged as tokens of friendship. Check out this beautiful video of the making of a kokeshi doll in the Naruko style! the material is taken...
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Entertainment in Japan

The Japanese entertainment industry is one of the world’s largest and most innovative, and despite the culture and language barrier, various forms of Japanese entertainment have become internationally popular. Karaoke Singing to the instrumental version of songs. Manga and Anime About Japanese comics and animation. Movies About the Japanese cinema. Amusement Parks About amusement and theme parks in Japan. Pachinko A mixture between pinball and slot machine. Hot Springs About hot springs (onsen). Department stores About Japanese department...
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Japanese Etiquette

Correct manners are very important among the Japanese. Also as a foreigner in Japan you should be familiar with at least the most basic rules: Inside the house How to behave in a Japanese home. Visiting shrines and temples How to behave at shrines and temples. Taking a bath How to take a bath in Japan. Japanese toilets How to use toilets in Japan. Table manners Basic rules of Japanese table manners. Chopsticks How to use Japanese chopsticks. Dining out How to dine at a restaurant in Japan. Sitting techniques How to sit properly in Japan. Greeting About...
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Arts and Crafts of Japan

Architecture About traditional and modern Japanese architecture. Bonsai About the art of cultivating miniature trees. Bunraku About traditional Japanese puppet theater. Calligraphy About the art of writing beautifully. Contemporary Art A list of sites to see contemporary art. Cormorant Fishing A traiditonal fishing method using cormorants. Dolls About various types of Japanese dolls. Gardens About Japanese gardens. Geisha About entertainers performing traditional Japanese arts. Ikebana About Japanese flower arrangement. Kabuki About traditional...
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Religion in Japan

Shinto and Buddhism are Japan’s two major religions. Shinto is as old as the Japanese culture, while Buddhism was imported from the mainland in the 6th century. Since then, the two religions have been co-existing relatively harmoniously and have even complemented each other to a certain degree. Most Japanese consider themselves Buddhist, Shintoist or both. Religion does not play a big role in the everyday life of most Japanese people today. The average person typically follows the religious rituals at ceremonies like birth, weddings and funerals, may visit...
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Temples of Japan

Temples of Japan

Temples are the places of worship in Japanese Buddhism. Virtually every Japanese municipality has at least one temple, while large cultural centers like Kyoto have several thousands.Temples store and display sacred Buddhist objects. Some temples used to be monasteries, and some still function as such. Structures typically found at Japanese temples are: Main hall The sacred objects of worship, such as statues, are displayed in the main hall. Main halls are called kondo, hondo, butsuden, amidado or hatto in Japanese. Example: Main hall...